When I first began really getting in to Linux and other open source projects I never imagined Microsoft participating in that world.  Nor did I want them to.  Looking back I do not quite understand the angst that drove me away from Microsoft, but I can say that by using Linux and Open Source Software such as Apache, MySQL, and PHP I have strengthened the knowledge I have of computing in general and software development specifically.  

"Teenage angst has paid off well." 

In this day and age creating a website and having it hosted is pretty cheap, yet there are still those, myself included, who would rather host their own website and potentially other services on their home network.  I have been doing this for years off and on and for non-production sites, such as development sites, or even personal sites I believe this to be a cost effective way to go. 

Below are a few details on how I have accomplished this using cheap tech and at very little cost, outside of what I am already paying for my current internet connection.  I will note that the speed with which your site is rendered will depend largely on your internet connection, hardware on which you host, the amount of graphics, and the general functionality of the site you are hosting. 

Well, I have finally crossed off the active TODO list for Linuxphile.  The last item I had, well, until I started writing this post, was to add full text search.  The little search box in the upper right has been for decoration purposes only, that is, until this evening. Tonight I finally sat down and set about creating the fulltext search. I had a little help from some friends, or rather the interwebs, which I consider friends, yes, friends, plural.  

In this article I cover how I have implemented ChartJS in my Laravel site.  Using an easy to use Javascript Library, a Laravel Controller which returns JSON data exactly as ChartJS expects I have been able to easily implement some simple reporting for Linuxphile.  

I recently purchased a Raspberry Pi 2 and have had it sitting around for about a week. With my birthday coming up, a day that coincides with Pi Day, I figured I might get started on using the Pi.  My wife and I have been developing websites both for fun and profit.  I have been wanting a way to inexpensively create some routing to our development environments when we need to demonstrate the sites as they are being developed.  I have also been wanting to play around a bit with node.js.  The stars aligned and I had a project in mind:  A Raspbery Pi setup as a reverse proxy to point to our development sites to our internal development machines/instances. 

Ok so with the Pi in hand, a 32Gb SD card, I began the journey by downloading a Pi image.  You can use just about any Pi image, however, I'd recommend Raspbian.